MLB: Ángel Hernández Needs His Cataracts Checked


Most think that is a legitimate question, although Hernández has been a fixture as one of baseball's worst umpires since 2006. Working at first base for a Cleveland at Kansas City game Wednesday night, Hernández had a horrible game even by his lowly standards. With runners on second and third with less than two out, the Royals Salvador Pérez hits a warning track fly ball that fell between Cleveland outfielders. The runner on third tagged up and scored, second base runner Andrew Benitnendi ran towards third base, then back to second after seeing Hernández call the batter out.


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Ultimately Pérez was deemed safe at first and Benintendi awarded third base. Meeting with pool reporters after the game, Hernández admitted he 'guessed'on the call, blaming a LED advert on the outfield wall with a powder blue background and white lettering. Later on Hernández blew another call when Cleveland's Jose Ramírez was ruled out on a play he beat out. It took the New York-area replay room all of 43 seconds to correct that call. Umpires works first base the day before working home plate, meaning Hernández calls balls and strikes for Thursday's series finale. Run, don't walk to the betting window and put a wager on Tribe manager Terry Francona getting ejected. Working behind the dish for a game in Anaheim earlier this season, Hernández was graded as missing 24 calls, a correct call percentage of 83.2 percent. For the afternoon Hernández graded at 86 percent compared to the industry average of 94 percent. Players such as Ian Kinsler and CC Sabathia have called for Hernández's ouster for several seasons. The Cuban-born Hernández once sued Major League Baseball on discrimination, as he has never earned the right to work in playoff games beyond the Divisional round. Lowly-ranked National Hockey League official Tim Peel was relieved of his duties earlier this year after being caught on a hot mic saying that he called a penalty on a team to even matters after an earlier penalty committed by the opposition.


With that as comparison, Hernández continues to be saved by one of the most powerful unions in the history of everything. Evidence says he doesn't have to answer much to his superiors and MLB umpires do not have to explain calls on the mic as is in football and hockey. Angel Hernández remains an independent-league level talent at his job duties. The only hope is that he someday leaves for a lucrative offer as a pro wrestling ref.